Bluegrass Funeral
 

STORIES OF KENTUCKY
   

Joseph G. Anthony
  



Bluegrass Funeral is available from your local bookstore, or from on-line vendors such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

REVIEWS & ARTICLES
  Courier-Journal
  Bluegrass Courier
  Herald-Leader – Tom Eblen
  Amazon.com
  




   BUY HERE   

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Wind Publications
600 Overbrook Drive
Nicholasville, KY 40356
books@windpub.com

 

Anthony has a knack for rhythmic pacing and crafting action-packed books that possess a profound sense of place and firmly plant the reader in the time and space he has created. 
         — Silas House
  
From the Cheapside slave markets of the1850’s to a lynch mob shouting for blood outside the 1920 Lexington courthouse, Joe Anthony remembers and creates a vivid and dramatic Kentucky. Feuds over “floater” votes in the 1870’s lead to burnings and killings, while efforts to force black farmers off good land cause tragedy in 1930’s horse country. Anthony’s characters bear witness to it all—two mourning mothers, one aristocratic, one a former “fancy” girl, find solace in the decade after the Civil War. Inter-racial lovers seek refuge in The Colored Reading Room, the only one in 1920’s Lexington. An escaped slave hides out at the Phoenix Hotel; a bluegrass divorcee sardonically views the scene at her ex’s funeral. Anthony’s pictures of Kentucky aren’t ones seen on postcards, but this Kentucky—sometimes violent, sometimes achingly loving— will stay in your mind for a long time to come.

Praise for Anthony's Previous Books —

About Pickering’s Mountain

“The stakes are high and the consequences huge in the memorable novel of pilgrim souls in an endangered place.”     
        — George Ella Lyon

“Anthony writes with insight and compassion…. A good book in a difficult time." 
        — Fredrick Smock, The Louisville Courier-Journal.


About Peril, Kentucky and Camden Blues

“Joseph G. Anthony’s Peril, Kentucky…is at once humorous and dark. Anthony introduces readers to an Eastern Kentucky community that welcomes and excludes according to its own code that outsiders cannot crack.” 
      — Judith Hatchett, Lexington Herald-Leader.

Camden Blues is “a kind of love story about a place that is pretty much done---a celebration of a place that isn’t celebrated anymore.” 
      — James Goode, New Madrid.