Butter in the Morning
 

Georgia Green Stamper
 

Butter in the Morning may be obtained from your local bookstore or from on-line vendors such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

REVIEWS
   Courier-Journal
    The Examiner
    Michael Embry


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Seldom have I read anything so rich and satisfying as Georgia Green Stamper’s delightful Butter in the Morning. It is a memoir, a history and a sociology text all in the guise of a collection of essays. These are no ordinary essays, however, they are tales from a life made extraordinary in the living and the telling. Indeed, in these difficult times when every day seems to bring news of yet one more failure of the human condition, Georgia shares story after story reflecting the intermingled sorrow and joy that have been the legacy of her people and her place. Through it all her outlook is one of hope, optimism, and humor—a joy from cover to cover.
Linda Scott DeRosier, Author of Creeker
     and Songs of Life and Grace

 Georgia Green Stamper is a wonderfully original writer. She is to Kentucky what Bailey White is to Georgia —unique in every way. Humorous, perceptive, and poignant, her essays are perfectly crafted gems illuminating those little moments in life that make it worth living, reminding us to appreciate the present before it quickly passes away. We are still smiling and mulling over her insights, long after we’ve read the last page.
Gwyn Hyman Rubio, author of Icy Sparks
     and The Woodsman’s Daughter

 Georgia Green Stamper’s essays do that most important thing that only the most accomplished writers are sometimes lucky to do: capture and preserve a place, a time, and its people. Stamper’s eye is sharp, and her pen is doubly so. Here is a book brimming with poetry and wisdom.
Silas House, author of Clay’s Quilt and The Coal Tattoo

 Each entry is wise, most are humorous and all are instructive. But it is the grace of Stamper’s syntax . . . that renders her writing special. . . . all of the author’s essays are as sharp and polished as faceted stones . . .
The Courier-Journal, review of
You Can Go Anywhere