Simon Girty
G i r t y
by Richard Taylor

   

Simon Girty

See Reviews -- 
Herald-Leader
Courier-Journal


This book may be obtained from your local bookstore, on-line vendors such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble, or you may order directly from the
publisher
.


ISBN 1893239500   $15.00.  


Wind Publications
600 Overbrook Dr
Nicholasville, KY 40356


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NEW EDITION with an introduction by
frontier historian Ted Franklin Belue

Fighting for the British and Indians, Simon Girty was a fierce warrior and ally of the native tribes, particularly the Shawnee and the Wyandots. An able frontiersman, as were Simon Kenton and Daniel Boone, and an acquaintance of both, his bloody exploits and legend made Girty the most hated and feared villain in Kentucky and the Ohio Valley. However, many who knew the man respected him for his convictions, principles, and bravery.

"Literate and provocative, Girty is at once a moving novel and a welcome revision of myth.  Mr. Taylor has managed to salvage a human personality out of the detritus of legend, to make a stock villain—without denying the villainy—complicated and real." 
The American Book Review

"When I want to read writing truly done, I read Girty, a poetic foray into a Dark and Bloody Ground that couples man and myth, romantic hero and implacable antihero. Iconoclastic in its tact, elegaic and spare in its lyricism, no other work on this singular man who was both so loved and reviled hits the mark so well and gives him a reason for being." 
Ted Franklin Belue

"If Kentucky books were awarded stars, Richard Taylor's Girty should have four on its cover." 

Lexington Herald-Leader

"Girty sheds his own legends in these pages, which neither glorify nor condemn him but render him as he likely was: more kin by nature to the defensive violence of the primitive red men than to the rapacious acquisitiveness of the civilized white ones. This good book instructs while it delights the hand that holds it, the eye that reads it, and the imagination in which it continues to live."
Hollins Critic