Leave Here Knowing
 

Elizabeth Oakes
 



Leave Here Knowing may be purchased from your local bookstore or from on-line vendors such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble.


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When you read a great book of poems, your first response is not to go back to the book.  Instead, what you want to do is to look around you, to see the world that the poems made new.  This is what Elizabeth Oakes’s Leave Here Knowing does for me.  Her poems about magic and hope, silence and the spirit within the silence, are in the great tradition of American poetry and art that searches for the transcendent in the real moment, a tradition that reaches from Anne Bradstreet through Emily Dickinson to Georgia O’Keefe.  Elizabeth Oakes’s poems open you up to that real moment and tell you, “Look, it’s here.”
— John Guzlowski, author of Lightning and Ashes

“We think back through our mothers if we are women,” Virginia Woolf contends. Elizabeth Oakes demonstrates in Leave Here Knowing that we think forward through them as well. I first became an Oakes fan in The Farmgirl Poems, a personal book with a plainspoken, intimate voice. In the new book that intimate voice is catapulted into the mythic without losing an iota of immediacy or clarity. It is a rare poet who can call forth the archetypal in both Tammy Wynette and Sappho. Elizabeth Oakes is just such a poet. Leave Here Knowing is a brilliant book, an indispensable guide into the mystery.
— Donna Hilbert, author of The Green Season

Libby Oakes has one of the clearest narrative voices I have ever read. Her heroines are notables, like Sappho or Virginia Wolf or Mary, the mother of Jesus. And if all of these women not known, they are noble and full-bodied, like elders, or like Kali, Lilith or the Moon. Reading the narrative is like stepping onto a ship for parts unknown. All of these women sail deep waters and carry  us with them through their passages. The characters are strong, certain and clear-eyed figureheads on a ship whose voices carry us toward an enchanted land filled with kindred spirits.
— Normandi Ellis, author of Going West